KARMA 2: Global Note Map Reference
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Background

KARMA's Note Map features can be used to produce a number of useful effects.

A Note Map is a table of 128 values, one for each MIDI Note. In the Korg Kronos, M3 and OASYS, and the KARMA Software, it is displayed as a large grid 129 x 128 (that's right, the Y axis is actually 129 values, including the "Remove" setting, described below.)

The Note Map feature comes at the end of a Module's note generation "chain", after the GE has already done whatever it is going to do to generate notes. The Note Map is a final overall note transposer that can be used on each note individually, or can be used on all notes within octaves (i.e. all Ds, all C#s, etc.) Each note that comes in as input (from the output of a GE) can be individually mapped to a different note on the output. In other words, you can take C3 and have it come out as G#5, for one example. This is particularly useful with Drum GEs, since you can selectively remap any note within a Drum Kit to play any other note - change a snare to a different snare, change the snare to play a sidestick, change the hi-hats to play ride cymbals or percussion - and those are just a few examples. There is also a "Remove" row at the bottom of the grid - any note can be removed, instead of remapped. Drop out the snare, drop out the kick, remove a percussion sound that is bothering you - quite useful at various times.

Summary

  • A Note Map is a huge grid of 128 columns x 129 rows containing 16,512 "cells" - one row to remap each of the 128 MIDI notes to any other note, plus one extra row to remove any note. Viewed on page 7-4-8 Note Map (M3) or 7-9 Name/Note Map (Kronos/OASYS), or the Note Map Editor of the optional KARMA Software, each cell represents one of the 128 incoming MIDI notes, and a potential remapping of the note to one of 128 different pitches or the special "remove" setting.
  • When you select a Note Map Table for a Module, the Module plays "through" the table. Incoming notes from KARMA are modified according to the mapping, and the modified pitches go out. So a default Custom Note Map is a straight diagonal line, representing "Linear" or "no change" response - what goes in is what comes out.
  • There is one Custom Note Map per Combi, Program or Song, that any or all of the Modules can use. Modules may also use Global Note Map Tables (described elsewhere). So while one Module may be using the Custom Note Map, others may still use one or more of the Global Note Maps.
  • As with most of KARMA's parameters, the Note Map selection can be assigned to the Real-Time Controls, and stored in each Scene - so you can have completely different Drum variations in each Scene, or different Melodic filters and scales in each Scene if desired.

Global Note Maps

Each KARMA Performance (that's combi or program in Korg-speak) stores a custom Note Map, that can be individually programmed to do whatever you want in each combi, program or song. In addition, there are 64 Global Note Maps that can be selected from the KARMA > Control page, or assigned to a slider/switch and varied in real-time. These Global Note Maps can be split into two categories: Global Drum Note Maps, and Global Melodic Note Maps.

Global Drum Note Maps

Of the 64 memory locations reserved for Global Note Map tables, the first 36 have been dedicated to Drum Grooves. The first 18 are the main Drum Note Maps; while the second 18 are virtually duplicates of the first 18, with the additional function of transposing the clap sound (D#3 in most Korg kits) the same way as the snare sound is handled. So the first 18 maps do nothing to the clap sound; while the second 18 treat the clap the same as a snare.

Here is a brief description of the Global Drum Maps:

Global Note Maps - Drum Grooves
1 sidestick/rides1 Maps all snare notes to the sidestick; maps the three hi-hats to the three ride cymbals. The effect is a typical drum groove variation where the drummer is "bringing it down" for a verse, or the beginning of an extended solo.
2 sidestick/rides2 Same as above, except the three hi-hats are mapped to a different arrangement of the three rides. This one maps the closed hi-hat to the ride bell, for the most obvious ride cymbal effect.
3 sidestick/rides3 Same as above, except the three hi-hats are mapped to a third arrangement of the three ride cymbals.
4 kick/sn swap1 In all of the Korg Drum Kits, there are at least 7 or 8 snares and 7 or 8 kicks on various notes. This map and the next three maps swap the locations of the kicks and the snares around so that, no matter what kick and snare your GE is using, you will get a different kick and snare to experiment with.
5 kick/sn swap2 Same as above; different arrangement of kicks and snares.
6 kick/sn swap3 Same as above; different arrangement of kicks and snares.
7 kick/sn swap4 Same as above; different arrangement of kicks and snares.
8 snare -> tamb Maps all snare notes to the tambourine sound, completely dropping out the snare and providing a breakdown variation for a more quiet section.
9 snare -> hh Maps all snare notes to the closed hi-hat sound, completely dropping out the snare and providing a breakdown variation for a more quiet section.
10 k/sn -> cl/tamb Maps all kick notes to the clave sound, and all snare notes to the tambourine sound, providing a percussion break effect for a more quiet section.
11 k/sn -> hh Maps all kick and snare notes to the closed hi-hat, completely dropping out the kick and snare and providing a very open major breakdown.
12 k/sn -> tamb Maps all kick and snare notes to the tambourine sound, completely dropping out the kick and snare and providing a very open major breakdown featuring the tambourine.
13 k/sn -> shakers Maps the kick and snare to two different shaker sounds, again breaking down the beat and adding some percussion for a quiet section.
14 k/sn -> agogo Maps the kick and snare to the hi and lo agogo bell sounds, providing a breakdown section with a latin percussion flavor.
15 k/sn -> triangle Maps all kick and snare sounds to the open and closed triangle sounds, providing an alternate breakdown section with a latin/jazz percussion flavor.
16 k/sn -> congas Maps all kick and snare sounds to the hi and lo congas, providing an alternate breakdown section with a latin/jazz percussion flavor.
17 k/sn -> congas2 Same as above, excpet uses the mute conga for one of the replacement sounds.
18 k/sn -> bongos Maps all kick and snare sounds to the hi and lo bongos providing an alternate breakdown section with a latin/jazz percussion flavor.
Tables 19~36 are duplicates of 1~18, with the addition of treating the clap sound the same as a snare sound.

Global Melodic Note Maps

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Tips & Tricks

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More References

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